Thrivikramji.com | REVAMP OF CRZMA GUIDELINES: Some thoughts Advance summary “Baby Marker Cairns” along the 500 m line from HTL The KCZMA has only maps depicting the delimited zones based on CRZ notification requests for permission to rebuild or build anew homes, commercial complexes and such other facilities. The district level authority is flooded by large number of requests for building permit. What is available outside of the maps of NCESS, which are static and covers only Trivandrum, Kollam, Alapuzhga dist., and Marad municipalitry and Cochin Corporation. A need for building visible markers or monuments like the cairns built at fixed intervals along the lines separating forest land from civilian or public land is strongly felt for the following reasons. Firstly, such visible marker structures, painted with Coast guard yellow bearing labels (that are painted on kilometer stones planted on the shoulder of highways) of ownership etc. would be a great deterrent to violators. Secondly, such structures also would encourage vibrant public vigilance, scrutiny and even reporting possible violations of CRZ rules to authorities. Thirdly such makers should be planted once every 100 meters along the 500 m delimitation line from the HTL. Fourthly this markers also will be erected on the shores of Kayals and river channels and the appropriate points indicating the setback limit from the shore or median of the natural water systems. Such plantings can be taken up using the MLA and MP funds in the respective areas. I propose at least a three meter tall concrete post very much similar to modern 6.09 m electricity pole used for overhead lines. However, unlike the former, these are “dwarf” or 3.0 m tall poles. These shall be planted just like the fixing of electricity poles, with at least 1.0 buried below the ground. I am sure this idea might sound crazy at the first reading. In India Karnataka has established such marker stones along the line limiting the 500.0 set back. It sure will be a smart deterrent to the potential violators. Interactive and WEB MAP in lieu of NCESS hard copies Any citizen settled in the coastal land of Kerala has the right to know exactly where his parcel of land is located with reference to the 500 m set back line from the HTL. Currently a trip or more to the repository of the CRZ management plan map are inevitable to satisfy the curious mind. In the context of e-governance and 4G service and even free web service such a change or transformation must be planned, designed and implemented. After all, the CRZ regulations are not only to regulate the random development in the setback swath of land, but also for delivery of service efficiently at times of storm surges, coastal erosion etc., and coastal erosion. Currently the published maps of the littoral gram panchayats are in the 1:25,000 scale SOI topomaps. But what is essential is not this map mostly un-understood by the interested citizen and the officials, but the delimitations drawn over respective satellite images of a resolution like 20 cm or 60 cm. As an afterthought, the NCESS may be contracted to do make the delimitation markings on a CARTOSAT 2 or 3 panchromatic images, which would have been far more precise and useful for the user public. This can be designed very much like the model of GOOGLEEARTH. This is practiced in many of the littoral states of nations. A satellite image base will make the reading and understanding the features, limits and boundaries with better reliability for the untrained mind. Currently the CRZMA, Kerala state has an apex body functioning from Trivandrum. The functions are implementation of the stipulations of the CRZ and at the same time enabling the general public needing to build or rebuild the facilities like houses, commercial buildings and so on and especially in the strip of land between the 200.0 m and 500.0 m from the high tide level. Further, the CRZMA has identified the “no go zone” of 50.0 m on either side and landward up to a point beyond which the salinity is below 5.0 ppt. However, these maps lack the boundaries of villages, as well as the cadastral map overlays. Therefore, for gathering data regarding whether or not a certain parcel of land is included or excluded in the delimited zone, a person will have to visit the village office to figure out this aspect by comparing the cadastral map on the one hand with the respective CRZ map/s. The latest maps now brought out by CESS, however overcomes the aforesaid handicap of the user as the CRZ base map combines the cadastral map and the CRZ delimited map. Uniquely Charted/Mapped backshore Kerala has a place of pride in that perhaps among the littoral states of the nation, only Kerala backshore is measured and marked with two series of coast guard yellow painted, marker stones by the KERI (PWD) labeled as KERI and CES and the distance (from some reference point/station) in kilometer and meter. This project was part of the coastal erosion monitoring program of KERI. As these maker stones are under (roughly) 60 cm above the ground, most of the time such marker stones are hidden from public view or access by fences, or piles of scrap etc. Further in the atlas of 99 maps by CESS (1996) marking the limits of 500 and 200 m from the HWL (high water line), is fairly undecipherable in the ground for an untrained eye or unskilled person. However, a vast improvement came into being by the publication of new series of maps (scale, 1:25,000) by NCESS (2014) for Trivandrum, Kollam, Alapuzha , Kochi corporation and Maradu municipality. These CZMP maps used SOI toposheets of 1:25,000 scale, 1:4000 and 1:5000 scale cadastral maps as well as world view satellite imageries (resolution 50 cm) in combination. As there is no mention is made of soft copies and interactive maps, it is presumed that no such data are available for the public to inspect from a internet café or from a desk top with internet connection. This means the needy public will have to go back to the district or village offices to figure out whether or not the property actively considered for development is under the purview of the CRZ rules. A new proposal is therefore presented in the following to make the process easier both for the potential investor or developer and the public vigilante to pin point any violation or possible violation. The system shall make the HTL visible and resolvable not only on the ground but also possibly from the orbiting satellites like Cartosat III . satellite Cartosat and high water
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REVAMP OF CRZMA GUIDELINES: Some thoughts Advance summary “Baby Marker Cairns” along the 500 m line from HTL The KCZMA has only maps depicting the delimited zones based on CRZ notification requests for permission to rebuild or build anew homes, commercial complexes and such other facilities. The district level authority is flooded by large number of requests for building permit. What is available outside of the maps of NCESS, which are static and covers only Trivandrum, Kollam, Alapuzhga dist., and Marad municipalitry and Cochin Corporation. A need for building visible markers or monuments like the cairns built at fixed intervals along the lines separating forest land from civilian or public land is strongly felt for the following reasons. Firstly, such visible marker structures, painted with Coast guard yellow bearing labels (that are painted on kilometer stones planted on the shoulder of highways) of ownership etc. would be a great deterrent to violators. Secondly, such structures also would encourage vibrant public vigilance, scrutiny and even reporting possible violations of CRZ rules to authorities. Thirdly such makers should be planted once every 100 meters along the 500 m delimitation line from the HTL. Fourthly this markers also will be erected on the shores of Kayals and river channels and the appropriate points indicating the setback limit from the shore or median of the natural water systems. Such plantings can be taken up using the MLA and MP funds in the respective areas. I propose at least a three meter tall concrete post very much similar to modern 6.09 m electricity pole used for overhead lines. However, unlike the former, these are “dwarf” or 3.0 m tall poles. These shall be planted just like the fixing of electricity poles, with at least 1.0 buried below the ground. I am sure this idea might sound crazy at the first reading. In India Karnataka has established such marker stones along the line limiting the 500.0 set back. It sure will be a smart deterrent to the potential violators. Interactive and WEB MAP in lieu of NCESS hard copies Any citizen settled in the coastal land of Kerala has the right to know exactly where his parcel of land is located with reference to the 500 m set back line from the HTL. Currently a trip or more to the repository of the CRZ management plan map are inevitable to satisfy the curious mind. In the context of e-governance and 4G service and even free web service such a change or transformation must be planned, designed and implemented. After all, the CRZ regulations are not only to regulate the random development in the setback swath of land, but also for delivery of service efficiently at times of storm surges, coastal erosion etc., and coastal erosion. Currently the published maps of the littoral gram panchayats are in the 1:25,000 scale SOI topomaps. But what is essential is not this map mostly un-understood by the interested citizen and the officials, but the delimitations drawn over respective satellite images of a resolution like 20 cm or 60 cm. As an afterthought, the NCESS may be contracted to do make the delimitation markings on a CARTOSAT 2 or 3 panchromatic images, which would have been far more precise and useful for the user public. This can be designed very much like the model of GOOGLEEARTH. This is practiced in many of the littoral states of nations. A satellite image base will make the reading and understanding the features, limits and boundaries with better reliability for the untrained mind. Currently the CRZMA, Kerala state has an apex body functioning from Trivandrum. The functions are implementation of the stipulations of the CRZ and at the same time enabling the general public needing to build or rebuild the facilities like houses, commercial buildings and so on and especially in the strip of land between the 200.0 m and 500.0 m from the high tide level. Further, the CRZMA has identified the “no go zone” of 50.0 m on either side and landward up to a point beyond which the salinity is below 5.0 ppt. However, these maps lack the boundaries of villages, as well as the cadastral map overlays. Therefore, for gathering data regarding whether or not a certain parcel of land is included or excluded in the delimited zone, a person will have to visit the village office to figure out this aspect by comparing the cadastral map on the one hand with the respective CRZ map/s. The latest maps now brought out by CESS, however overcomes the aforesaid handicap of the user as the CRZ base map combines the cadastral map and the CRZ delimited map. Uniquely Charted/Mapped backshore Kerala has a place of pride in that perhaps among the littoral states of the nation, only Kerala backshore is measured and marked with two series of coast guard yellow painted, marker stones by the KERI (PWD) labeled as KERI and CES and the distance (from some reference point/station) in kilometer and meter. This project was part of the coastal erosion monitoring program of KERI. As these maker stones are under (roughly) 60 cm above the ground, most of the time such marker stones are hidden from public view or access by fences, or piles of scrap etc. Further in the atlas of 99 maps by CESS (1996) marking the limits of 500 and 200 m from the HWL (high water line), is fairly undecipherable in the ground for an untrained eye or unskilled person. However, a vast improvement came into being by the publication of new series of maps (scale, 1:25,000) by NCESS (2014) for Trivandrum, Kollam, Alapuzha , Kochi corporation and Maradu municipality. These CZMP maps used SOI toposheets of 1:25,000 scale, 1:4000 and 1:5000 scale cadastral maps as well as world view satellite imageries (resolution 50 cm) in combination. As there is no mention is made of soft copies and interactive maps, it is presumed that no such data are available for the public to inspect from a internet café or from a desk top with internet connection. This means the needy public will have to go back to the district or village offices to figure out whether or not the property actively considered for development is under the purview of the CRZ rules. A new proposal is therefore presented in the following to make the process easier both for the potential investor or developer and the public vigilante to pin point any violation or possible violation. The system shall make the HTL visible and resolvable not only on the ground but also possibly from the orbiting satellites like Cartosat III . satellite Cartosat and high water

REVAMP OF CRZMA GUIDELINES: Some thoughts Advance summary “Baby Marker Cairns” along the 500 m line from HTL The KCZMA has only maps depicting the delimited zones based on CRZ notification requests for permission to rebuild or build anew homes, commercial complexes and such other facilities. The district level authority is flooded by large number of requests for building permit. What is available outside of the maps of NCESS, which are static and covers only Trivandrum, Kollam, Alapuzhga dist., and Marad municipalitry and Cochin Corporation. A need for building visible markers or monuments like the cairns built at fixed intervals along the lines separating forest land from civilian or public land is strongly felt for the following reasons. Firstly, such visible marker structures, painted with Coast guard yellow bearing labels (that are painted on kilometer stones planted on the shoulder of highways) of ownership etc. would be a great deterrent to violators. Secondly, such structures also would encourage vibrant public vigilance, scrutiny and even reporting possible violations of CRZ rules to authorities. Thirdly such makers should be planted once every 100 meters along the 500 m delimitation line from the HTL. Fourthly this markers also will be erected on the shores of Kayals and river channels and the appropriate points indicating the setback limit from the shore or median of the natural water systems. Such plantings can be taken up using the MLA and MP funds in the respective areas. I propose at least a three meter tall concrete post very much similar to modern 6.09 m electricity pole used for overhead lines. However, unlike the former, these are “dwarf” or 3.0 m tall poles. These shall be planted just like the fixing of electricity poles, with at least 1.0 buried below the ground. I am sure this idea might sound crazy at the first reading. In India Karnataka has established such marker stones along the line limiting the 500.0 set back. It sure will be a smart deterrent to the potential violators. Interactive and WEB MAP in lieu of NCESS hard copies Any citizen settled in the coastal land of Kerala has the right to know exactly where his parcel of land is located with reference to the 500 m set back line from the HTL. Currently a trip or more to the repository of the CRZ management plan map are inevitable to satisfy the curious mind. In the context of e-governance and 4G service and even free web service such a change or transformation must be planned, designed and implemented. After all, the CRZ regulations are not only to regulate the random development in the setback swath of land, but also for delivery of service efficiently at times of storm surges, coastal erosion etc., and coastal erosion. Currently the published maps of the littoral gram panchayats are in the 1:25,000 scale SOI topomaps. But what is essential is not this map mostly un-understood by the interested citizen and the officials, but the delimitations drawn over respective satellite images of a resolution like 20 cm or 60 cm. As an afterthought, the NCESS may be contracted to do make the delimitation markings on a CARTOSAT 2 or 3 panchromatic images, which would have been far more precise and useful for the user public. This can be designed very much like the model of GOOGLEEARTH. This is practiced in many of the littoral states of nations. A satellite image base will make the reading and understanding the features, limits and boundaries with better reliability for the untrained mind. Currently the CRZMA, Kerala state has an apex body functioning from Trivandrum. The functions are implementation of the stipulations of the CRZ and at the same time enabling the general public needing to build or rebuild the facilities like houses, commercial buildings and so on and especially in the strip of land between the 200.0 m and 500.0 m from the high tide level. Further, the CRZMA has identified the “no go zone” of 50.0 m on either side and landward up to a point beyond which the salinity is below 5.0 ppt. However, these maps lack the boundaries of villages, as well as the cadastral map overlays. Therefore, for gathering data regarding whether or not a certain parcel of land is included or excluded in the delimited zone, a person will have to visit the village office to figure out this aspect by comparing the cadastral map on the one hand with the respective CRZ map/s. The latest maps now brought out by CESS, however overcomes the aforesaid handicap of the user as the CRZ base map combines the cadastral map and the CRZ delimited map. Uniquely Charted/Mapped backshore Kerala has a place of pride in that perhaps among the littoral states of the nation, only Kerala backshore is measured and marked with two series of coast guard yellow painted, marker stones by the KERI (PWD) labeled as KERI and CES and the distance (from some reference point/station) in kilometer and meter. This project was part of the coastal erosion monitoring program of KERI. As these maker stones are under (roughly) 60 cm above the ground, most of the time such marker stones are hidden from public view or access by fences, or piles of scrap etc. Further in the atlas of 99 maps by CESS (1996) marking the limits of 500 and 200 m from the HWL (high water line), is fairly undecipherable in the ground for an untrained eye or unskilled person. However, a vast improvement came into being by the publication of new series of maps (scale, 1:25,000) by NCESS (2014) for Trivandrum, Kollam, Alapuzha , Kochi corporation and Maradu municipality. These CZMP maps used SOI toposheets of 1:25,000 scale, 1:4000 and 1:5000 scale cadastral maps as well as world view satellite imageries (resolution 50 cm) in combination. As there is no mention is made of soft copies and interactive maps, it is presumed that no such data are available for the public to inspect from a internet café or from a desk top with internet connection. This means the needy public will have to go back to the district or village offices to figure out whether or not the property actively considered for development is under the purview of the CRZ rules. A new proposal is therefore presented in the following to make the process easier both for the potential investor or developer and the public vigilante to pin point any violation or possible violation. The system shall make the HTL visible and resolvable not only on the ground but also possibly from the orbiting satellites like Cartosat III . satellite Cartosat and high water

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